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How workaholism may hinder your career development instead

While the wake of a robust work culture has led to a lot of positives including the emergence of a sincere work ethic, it certainly has had its own pitfalls like that of an obsessive workaholism. Workaholism, in recent years, has skyrocketed as a culture among the young people and the youth is leaving no stone unturned to show it off. Young and ambitious professionals and entrepreneurs are using every last bit of their energy to get better in their jobs, to grab that promotion, or to avail that opportunity.
And that’s a beautiful thing! Until it backfires.
How on earth can hard work ever backfire, you must be wondering? Well, that’s exactly what we shall be discussing in this blog post.
When I say your hard work and obsession may backfire, don’t get me wrong – all I mean over there is your obsession may, there are possibilities, sometime cause you to be short-sighted, or limit you from looking at the bigger picture. And that backfires – that exactly is what hinders your career trajectory…

On Digital Divide – ‘The’ new face of Inequality

Note: In this post, I have used APA style citation due to certain unavoidable reasons.
For the past few weeks, I have been here in a remote village – and I mean it when I say ‘remote’. The village is 300 kms from the nearest metropolitan city, 100+ kms from the nearest railway station, 30 kms from the District headquarter, and 15 kms from the nearest National Highway (that’s the nearest road, you can say – the 15 km road till the NH is less of a road and more of a walking trail).
The positives, however, in addition to the breath-taking greenery and scenic hills, are quite a few. The village has got an electricity connection since past 15 years, and now almost everyone in the village has an electricity connection to their houses. The village got its first Public Service Centre (Jan Seva Kendra) afew years back and it's working fine to avail some of the benefits of e-governance to the villagers. Majority of the youth do have access to the internet and do use it regularly, thanks to t…

Part II: So, who is liable?

In the previous post (Part I: Automation & Ethics:Applying Trolleyology), we discussed the introductory part to this article; the inherent ethical dilemma in the trolley problem and how that’s relevant to the current scenario of automated devices and self-driving cars. We discussed certain situations, including the Moral Machine by MIT, and our discussion was primarily ethical. In this post, we’ll carry forward the discussion from an ethical one to a legal one; discussing particular significant legal implications of the issues discussed beforehand.
We discussed ethics in the previous post and observed that people have varying stands when it comes to categorising what particularly is ethical and what is unethical. Despite this personal biases and difference of opinions, every society has certain ethical standards and it enforces the same by way of punishing the unethical. Theft is punished, trespassing is punished, defaming is punished; killing is punished, too, be it five workmen o…

Part I: Automation & Ethics - Applying Trolleyology

Consider the following situation:
You are a trolley driver, driving a trolley on a nice sunny day, when you notice five men working on the street in front of you, in your way. You blow the horn multiple times, but then notice they all are wearing earphones while working and hence can’t hear you approaching. Frustrated, you reach out to the brake, and to your shock, you find out that the brake isn’t working at all. Your mind goes blank, and frightened, just at the thought of what’s going to happen to the five workmen when the trolley hits them shortly.
However, suddenly you notice that there’s a small diversion just before the workmen whichto you can divert your trolley easily and quickly, thereby saving the five workmen! What a relief!
But the relief was only momentary – as you consider taking the diversion, you find out that the diversion isn’t all clear, either. There’s one man working thereon, and if you turn the steering to take the diversion, his death is certain.
There you sit, on y…

Climate Change and Information Technology: Interconnections and Solutions

INTRODUCTION “It is now clear to most observers that ICTs have a very important role to play here. Recognition of this at the international level will provide countries with a solid argument to roll out climate change strategies with a strong ICT element.” -Hamadoun Toure, ITU Secretary General (2011)[1] Numerous documents, policy papers, and research symposiums have called for the need for recognition of the value of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in monitoring deforestation, crop patterns, and other related matters that call for environmental concern. Answering with common prudence, with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) having penetrated so deep into our day to day personal as well as professional lives, it is highly unlikely that it wouldn’t pose a solution to the climate change issue, alongside a number of possible threats. If the whole climate change solution regime were to be divided into two broad segments for the convenience of intellectual dis…

On Indianness: #Throwback to a long-forgotten tradition

“आनोभद्राःक्रतवोयन्तुविश्वतः” – Rig Veda(Let noble thoughts come to me from all directions.)
(In honour of the 5000-year old culture that taught me to de-contextualise and de-personalise every piece of wisdom.)The India that we get to see today came into being only in 1947, and later.
Prior to that, the whole landmass that we refer to as India was never a part of a single empire, never had a uniform governance, evidently had a high-degree of socio-cultural as well as geographical diversity, and seemingly had no single feature which can be found to be common across the subcontinent. And yet, not only the outer world recognised this whole landmass as one, but the people inside somewhere had this feeling that they’re one – they belong to one!
Interesting, but how?
The whole subcontinent, throughout its history, no matter how diverse it was in its socio-cultural and political affairs, has always had a common essence – a common signature trait that was rare in other contemporary civilisations…

Do we still need feminism?

With a dozen of stories on women entrepreneurs being aired on the news channels on a regular basis, large number of women employees flooding the white-collar jobs, and equally large number of bold women coming out and raising their voices for their rights, it is easy to think that we have achieved a great deal of socio-economic gender equality, if not political yet, and do not need feminism any more.
The question is, is it so?
I beg to differ.
Let’s start from the roots. What does feminism mean, first of all? The Oxford Dictionary defines it as the advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of sexual equality. Now, leaving aside my opinion that I’m intending to pen down through this article, if feminism is really the advocacy of women’s rights on the grounds of sexual equality, that naturally implies that it’d never get old.
Revolutions must never rest, and the fight for rights must never end, if we want a balanced society, as observed by countless political philosophers. And via analogy,…
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